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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
where you left off. more than ever, when we talk about the nightmare in japan, we're really talking about two nightmares. the nuclear one and everything else. again today, fire broke out at that devastated fukushima daiichi plant. and another blast of radiation escaped, for reasons still not entirely clear. the few remaining workers had to leave but they came right back in even greater numbers when the danger eased. this crisis stems from overheated fuel rods but elsewhere in japan, a cold snap, including snow, adding to the misery. searching, supporting, surviving, all of it is made more grueling because of the weather. officially the death toll topped 4,000, with more than 8,000 considered missing. this woman is scouring the rubble for her uncle. she thought she may have found his shoe. the nation heard from the emperor, reserveder pot direst of national emergencies. the emperor act key per act hes heart is broken. the volunteer utility workers who have been exposed to life-threatening radiation levels ots fukushima daiichi. their company hasn't released personal information abou
on this site, there are life threatening doses of radiation. >> japan's emperor addressed his nation today. an extraordinary event reserved for times of war or dire national crises. he says he's touched by the japanese people's calm and order in the face of disaster. >>> well, foreigners scrambled to leave tokyo today. france is urging its citizens to get out now or at least head to southern japan. japan has lost control of fukushima. evacuees say they don't trust the japanese government to be forthcoming. >> i don't believe what i've been told. you know, people are evacuating. all foreigners are evacuating, large multi-national companies, foreign companies are evacuating. you don't really know what to believe. it's better to play it safe. >>> harrowing new video of the moments the tsunami struck. people scream as they try to outrun the water. >>> this is said to be ground zero for the tsunami. a coastal town home to 17,000 people. most are feared dead. a cnn i-reporter sent us this video at the moment the 9.0 earthquake struck. shot it at a tokyo department store. remember, tokyo is 230 m
forced from benjawahd and regrouped. >>> japan working to keep reactors cool and try to prevent radioactive water from leaking to the ocean. tons of water to keep fuel from overheating have been contaminated with radiation. workers are using sandbags and concrete panels to hold back the water. >>> pakistan's cricket team have been practicing for a game for which their world cup, standing, and national pride are at stake. on wednesday, pakistan plays india. a big match helping to soothe often bitter relations. thousands of people are expected to skip work to watch the game. i'm zain verjee in london. "world business today" starts now. >>> good morning from cnn london. >> and good afternoon from cnn hong kong, i'm pauline chu. this is kporld business today. the top stories on this wednesday, march 30, tepco's troubles keep mounting up. now the company's president has been hospitalized, apparently suffering from stress. >> high fuel prices and natural disasters clip qantas' wings. how the australian airline is cutting back. >> and businesses in india and pakistan are bowled over by
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
. >> darya: in japan workers are trying to cool the plant where they were evacuated today after smoke rose from the damaged reactor. the cause of the smoke is unclear, the agency says the operator of the complex repeatedly had failed to be crucial inspections of equipment. in the weeks before that the plant was crippled by the earthquake in tsunami. workers have tried to spray the reactors with concrete. one of the several efforts to curb their release. instead of spreading water they are to bring concrete. it would only come into play if water does not cool the reactor spirit this is the latest we do we have. after week of blowing from the no west, when have now shifted threatening to blow radiation to more populated areas to the south. the pattern with the winds blowing from the north east through much of japan is expected to continue through tomorrow. that could carry material on shore from the facility, 150 mi. north of tokyo. >> reporter: monitoring some live pictures at of rockville md.. this is the commission meeting right now one of the things, that they came up with so far is that
. we find ourselves with the world's most under reported story, a massive humanitarian crisis in japan caused by the quake and the following tsunami. what we could all be doing to help. dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. her morning begins with arthritis pain. that's a coffee and two pills. the afternoon tour begins with more pain and more pills. the evening guests arrive. back to sore knees. back to more pills. the day is done but hang on... her doctor recommended aleve. just 2 pills can keep arthritis pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is lara who chose 2 aleve and fewer pills for a day free of pain. and get the all day pain relief of aleve in liquid gels. and fewer pills for a day free of pain. but you can still refinance to a fixed rate as low as 4.75% at lendingtree.com, where customers save an average of $293 a month. call lending tree at... today. [ male announcer ] when you have plaque psoria
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
, japan. maybe turkey, maybe saudi arabia. these all will be people who can hip the know sill -- facilitatr and bridge on it. you have to take a role among because you need them to take a position in an agreement perhaps that says we will respect what the afghans have agreed to. we will not intervene. we will treat afghanistan as it wishes to be treated, whether that's neutral or not aligned or some other basis. weill ntinue to provide them with economic assistance. if a new afghan government needs security help, we will do so. it says in effect that we need peacekeeping perhaps for verification and monitoring. a all though things are part of what we would call the second circle negotiation which fits in and around the first circle negotiation among afghans. >> i think what we saw is that in ten years on, this war, positions have changed and the parties have expressed these different opinions. this general attitude, i think, you know, led us to say, you can build a kind of construction around the word negotiation. >> charlie: here's my question. is this a role model, as you
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
about the scintillation at japan's failing to nuclear power plant. live coverage from the senate in the tree committee began said 10:00 a.m. eastern. over on c-span3, us senate hearing on protecting the civil rights of muslim americans. witnesses include an official from the justice the apartment. that also stars at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> experience american history on c-span3. 48 hours of people events telling the american story. here first-person accounts for people who have shaped modern america on "oral histories." history writers and travel to important battle skills and learn about keep figures and events that should be aired during the 100th the 150th anniversary of the civil war. professor spilled into america's past during lectures and history. join curators and the story behind the scene and museum exhibits on american artifacts. the presidency, focusing on policies and legacies, as told to historic speeches and personal insights from administration officials and experts. american history tv on c-span3, all we can, every weekend. get our complete schedule online and sig
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. i have one friend tell me that there's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's. then the japanese took it. they are afraid that if people give in, it will blow up. -- they're afraid that, if you plug it in, it will blow up. some people have suggested there is seven times at the pumps. i think there will be a while because that reactor dissolves if it ever does. if they do not have a power plant, what they need this and richard uranium for? the other things that have gone the assassinations of nuclear scientists as so on, it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slowdown. i do not think that they will give up their determination to have a program meant to say that they have a right to the program. that is a nationalistic issue. that will let go away. >> that is a lesson not just for the iran, but for the entire middle east. >> it could really be a counter- proliferation -- if it is a horrible cause for the japanese, but it is important for all of the the country to want nuclear power. >> with afghanistan being a majority pest
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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